Heebie Jeebies Los Angeles
thegildedcentury:

Weird Tales, May, 1942

thegildedcentury:

Weird Tales, May, 1942

(via whoakeanu)

Groovy!

(Source: armyofnightmares, via whoakeanu)

visionsoflight:

Gate of Hell

・ ・ ・

Director: Teinosuke Kinugasa

Director of Photography: Kōhei Sugiyama

(via whoakeanu)

wacksabbath:

Ingmar Bergman and Bruce the Shark

wacksabbath:

Ingmar Bergman and Bruce the Shark

(Source: criterioncollection)

archiemcphee:

These beautiful moths and butterflies look like they’re ready to flutter up and away, but they won’t be doing so because they’re wonderful textile sculptures painstakingly created by North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita. She sews, embroiders and stitches all sorts of multi-colored fabrics to create these oversized insects, which measure nearly a foot wide. She also adds painted details along with feathers and artificial fur. With great care Okita has achieved an awesome balance between astonishing realism and fanciful invention.

Click here to view more of Yumi Okita’s gorgeous textile insect sculptures.

[via Colossal and Demilked]

(via kittykittybewmbewm213)

The photography of William Eggleston

A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide , in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers. 

Eggleston has published his work extensively. He continues to live and work in Memphis, and travels considerably for photographic projects. (x)

(Source: vintagegal, via adventuresintheabyss)

Cataloguing the things I enjoy.